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LUMISTAR INFRARED IMAGING NEWS

By Lumistar's Chief Scientist

August 15, 2014

Thermal Cameras Catch Heat During Social Interactions

LumistarBlog-ThermalFace

Using thermal imaging cameras, researchers at the University of St Andrews (St Andrews, UK) Perception Lab, have found that when heterosexual women interact socially with men, it causes a noticeable rise in the temperature of their faces. University scientists studied temperature changes in only women for this report.  The study was conducted to see if interpersonal social contact can elicit facial temperature changes as studies in the past dealt with other forms of emotional arousal such as fear and stress. Thermal responses were measured using a thermal imager with thermal sensitivity (NETD): less than 80 mK, 1 frame per 75 s. Object emissivity was set at 0.98, the standard value for skin. Infrared images were taken during a standardized interaction with a same- and opposite-sex experimenter using skin contact in a number of potentially high–intimate (face and chest) and low–intimate (arm and palm) locations. When peer-aged male laboratory agents touched heterosexual female participants on the face or chest the test subjects showed major (more than one degree Celsius) temperature responses on the face. What was surprising is that women’s facial temperature increased by one degree Celsius during any interaction with the male experimenter, using the thermal camera to record the observation. When other women laboratory agents did the tests on these same women subjects,  gender alone influenced the reaction of women, who showed no thermal response to interaction with other women.  Researchers hope to use this data to eventually develop a lie detector test for national security purposes. Studies show increases in temperature occur on the forehead when lying. “Thermal imaging offers new possibilities in the study of psychological responses to social interactions and is of particular interest in the context of mating signals.” Or maybe it will be used by social networks if infrared seeking cameras are incorporated into computing devices like your phone as a standard feature.

More information on the research can be found here.





June 15, 2014

Infrared Camera Helps Analyze Parts At Over Mach 5

Lumistar Corp Mach 5

Manchester University (Manchester, UK) researchers are using a thermal imaging camera to examine the performance of aerospace components in a wind tunnel. The knowledge gained by the wind tunnel tests will help designers of high-speed aircraft and re-entry space vessels that need to bring payloads to orbit and return to Earth.  The wind tunnel at the university is one of the few experimental facilities in Europe that can reach Mach numbers higher than 5. According to Professor Konstantinos Kontis, head of the Aerospace Research Group at Manchester University , the prolonged exposure to friction induced heat caused by the air flowing across the surface of an aircraft traveling at Mach 5 can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the material used in aircraft components. It is therefore important to test such components extensively before they are deployed in the field.

To capture thermal maps of the entire surface of the parts under test in the wind tunnel, the thermal imaging camera which contains an uncooled microbolometer detector that produces thermal images at a thermal sensitivity of 50mK (0.05°C), is located on top of the test chamber, looking in through a protective housing. This allows the camera to accurately map the thermal hot spots caused by the air friction, without being subjected to the force of high velocity air-flows. The full resolution can be captured at a frame rate of 50 fps, but it also provides high-speed windowing modes that allow the operator to increase the frame rate to 200 fps. The captured thermal footage along with it’s radiometric temperature data is analyzed with specialized software. “We use it to capture the data, define special regions of interest and export the temperature measurement strings to third party software for an in-depth analysis of the data,” says Dr. Erdem. On one end of the wind tunnel there is a chamber capable of containing pressurized air up to 15 bar, 15 times Earth’s regular atmospheric air pressure. At the other end is a vacuum tank which is brought to 1 milibar, one thousandth of regular atmospheric air pressure. In between the two is the test chamber where the test object is placed. As the pressurized air travels from the pressure chamber into the vacuum chamber, it passes the test object with a speed of about 6,000 kilometer per hour, similar to traveling at Mach 6 or approximately four thousand miles per hour at 50,000 feet (flight level 50), the highest altitude at which planes don’t lose air density. Velocity at sea level to obtain Mach 6 is 3,147 miles per hour. The difference in the velocity at different altitudes is due to the fact that the earth is spherical, so the amount of speed needed to cover a certain distance of the earth’s surface at a low altitude, is a lot lower than the amount needed to cover the same distance of the earth’s surface at a very high altitude.





April 15, 2014

Lumistar Proves to be #1 Leader in Shredder Cameras

Why A High Quality Shredder Camera?
Shredder operators operate their shredder ‘blind,’ due to steam, darkness and view obstruction. Operators often rely on vibration, RPM, and amp gauges to determine if they are about to jam or choke the shredder infeed. Frequently, out of fear, operators consistently underfeed in order to avoid jamming therefore losing valuable time and money. In the November 2013 issue of  the American Recycler, in an article entitled “Metal Shredders Face Stiff Competition”, Frank Goulding, member of the Board of Directors and Chair of the Shredder Committee for ISRI, reported:

“His [Goulding’s] shredders are running at roughly 60 percent capacity. They are focusing on lowering cost of production, trying to lean-out the cost of operating shredders and getting down the cost per ton. [He] is focusing on labor and practices, managing energy, looking at wear parts, evaluating equipment they are using to feed and support the shredder, looking downstream at other ways to separate metals and recovering more nonferrous from the residue.”

Our Solution!
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March 15, 2014

Technique with Thermal Camera Spots Nuclear Materials

Lumistar thermal hyper-spectral analysis

For two Brigham Young University professors, long wave infrared hyperspectral imaging holds the potential to spot from afar whether a site is being used to make nuclear weapons. Infrared cameras capture electromagnetic wavelengths beyond the color ‘rainbow red’ which is invisible to the human eye. Hyper-spectral infrared cameras capture this light in hundreds of narrow bands, as opposed to broadband which is a couple of bands or multispectral which is only 10s of bands. The human eye as well as traditional cameras see spectral broadbands of red-green-blue. Since different materials reflect or absorb infrared light, hyperspectral imaging divides the high-resolution spectra at each pixel. Materials in long-wave thermal infrared are emissive (rather than reflective) and therefore have a unique spectra. Certain objects leave ‘fingerprints’ across these imaging spectral divides known as spectral signatures, and enable the identification of materials that make up the scanned object. For example, a spectral signature of radioactive materials helps the CIA find illegal nuclear weapon production, as well as gases coming from factories or other banned chemicals. Identification of materials would be straightforward if those were the only signals bouncing back at the camera. But other incoming signals, such as the object’s temperature and the weather conditions, muddle the analysis and add noise to the material’s light signature. The novelty of the BYU study is that it directly separates the incoming signals to provide the material’s unique signature. The measured spectra are a convolution of the material spectra (emissivity), the black body temperature (Planck curve), other interacting environmental spectral sources, and measurement error.  One approach to material identification is temperature-emissivity separation (TES), which separates or deconvolves the material spectra from the temperature curve.  This algorithmic model is able to identify the material emissivity spectra, and cluster pixels into appropriate material groups. Imagine taking an infrared picture from above a city struck by an earthquake or tornado. In addition to spotting all the gas leaks, it could reveal the exact gases being leaked and their concentrations in different neighborhoods. There are also other classified areas this research could go.

Learn More Here


Filed under: Camera,Infrared,Lumistar,Technology,Thermal Imaging — Tags: — Lumistar @ 08:00



February 15, 2014

Infrared Camera Used On Players During Super Bowl

Lumistar NFL Infrared Camera

Super Bowl XLVIII fans might be interested to know they used a very sensitive infrared camera that showed how players’ for the Seahawks and Broncos body temperatures changed throughout the game. To achieve this goal a cooled midwave infrared camera with a 6x continuous zoom lens and a cooled detector were used. “I don’t know what story that tells, but it might make for some pretty cool pictures,” Eric Shanks, Fox Sports chief operating officer and executive producer, told the Television Critics Association in January. Fox Sports the host network for the Super Bowl touted the game as “the coldest and boldest Super Bowl ever” in its advertising weeks before the February 2 kickoff. Shanks said the pre-game timing will be altered slightly because of the temperature so people aren’t on the field standing around too long waiting for the players to come out. “We have spent a lot of time with the league going over contingency plans,” Shanks said, noting three NFL games on Fox this season were delayed because of weather. The first cold-weather Super Bowl was actually pretty warm at 53 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperatures for Sunday’s NFL title game at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. were 10 to 15 degrees above normal, and just nine degrees below the record high of 62 set in 1973. It’s not what league owners expected weeks before the game and even as far back as 2010 when the stadium contract was awarded. Snow, ice and frigid temperatures were expected, and they feared the temperatures would detract from the game normally held in outdoor warm-weather cities or in a domed stadium. The Seahawks won 43-8.

Learn More Here


Filed under: Camera,Company,Infrared,Lumistar,Technology,Thermal Imaging — Tags: — Lumistar @ 08:00



January 15, 2014

Coldest Spot On Earth Found By Thermal Camera

Lumistar coldest spot on eath

If one had to guess where the coldest place on Earth is, if you guessed Antarctica you’d be right. The coldest place on Earth has been measured by a space-borne high resolution thermal infrared camera sensor on the recently launched satellite named Landsat-8. On August 10, 2010 during the 24hr dark Antarctic winter months, it was recorded to be a bitter -135.8 Fahrenheit/-93.2 Celsius at a latitude of 81.8 degrees South and a longitude of 59.3 degrees East, at an elevation of about 3,900 meters. It turns out there are many cold spots in Antarctica “strung out like pearls” at each peak along the ridges. The satellite’s sophisticated thermal camera sensor made its way through the dry and clear air that surrounds the interior of Antarctica all the way to the ice’s surface where the temperature was taken. Traditionally, the temperature has to be taken in the air for it to count in the world record books, but scientists are certain the air above the surface is cold enough to beat the current record in 1983 by the Russians also in Antarctica, by at least -4 degrees Celsius/-25 Fahrenheit. In fact, the thermal camera is at such high resolution scientists aren’t sure how to fully calibrate it’s sensor until it has more time to understand all the data Landsat-8 is giving them. Scientists speculate it is in fact be even colder in these spots by several degrees. They hope to get some ground based instruments capable of air temperature there in order to take a measurement and secure the world record. By comparison, the coldest temperature recorded in Alaska and Siberia is about -43/ -45F, and the summit of Greenland being -63C/ -81F. The lowest temperature recorded on Earth’s moon is that of -238C/ -396F.

In case you were wondering if this high resolution thermal sensor also happen to record the hottest place on earth — it did. The hottest surface temperature on earth recorded by Landsat-8 was in Dasht-e Lut salt desert in southeast Iran, where it reached +70.7 Celsius/+159.3 Fahrenheit in 2005.

More Info


Filed under: Camera,Infrared,Lumistar,Technology,Thermal Imaging — Tags: , — Lumistar @ 08:00



December 15, 2013

Robot Security Guards Have Thermal Imaging Camera

Lumistar Blog Knightscope K5

At 5 feet tall, 300 pounds a new droid is coming to a shopping mall near you for working for only $6.25 an hour. The average minimum wage in the United States is $7.25, or 9.32 in Washington state. Coming in substantially under those costs, Knightscope’s robot watchman service raises questions about whether artificial intelligence and robotics technologies are beginning to add another dimension to the workforce. This mobile robot known as the K5 Autonomous Data Machine, will replace security guards, with an industry wide high turnover of more than 400% at private security firms, or as the economic projections predict fulfill unmet demand as there will be a shortage of security personnel by 2024. Areas of interest for this new device, available next year, are schools, shopping centers, hotels, auto dealerships, stadiums, casinos, law enforcement agencies, seaports, and airports. The National Center for Education Statistics estimates 1.9 million incidents of violence, theft, or other crimes had taken place during the 2009-10 school year. Additionally, 790,000+ students reported carrying a weapon on school property on one or more days during a 30-day period because they felt unsafe. The company that makes the K5 hopes to put a dent in the $1+ trillion negative economic impact all crime has presently. The Knightscope K5 has a lot of this mash up of tech inside so that it can essentially see, hear, smell and ‘feel’. But as with all things robotic in order to see at night to be even remotely capable as humans it must have infrared. With thermal imaging cameras the machine has super vision in all conditions. Also on-board are analytics, proximity sensors, high quality microphones, biological, chemical and radiological detection, 360-degree HD video, GPS, and 3D mapping, radar, a laser range finder (LIDAR), ultrasonic speed and distance sensors, air quality sensor, and optical character recognition technology for scanning things like license plates for starters. The Knightscope founders believe in their future hard worker will be capable of crime prediction, or “precog” — a theme of the movie “Minority Report.” The all-seeing mobile robots will eventually be wirelessly connected to a centralized data server, where they will have access to “big data,” making it possible to recognize faces, license plates and other suspicious anomalies. Privacy advocates have concerns this is simply a real-time Google Street View System. The company defends their product by saying, “We have a different perspective. We don’t want to think about ‘RoboCop’ or ‘Terminator,’ we prefer to think of a mash-up of ‘Batman,’ ‘Minority Report’ and R2D2.” The K5 is not armed at this time.

Read More


Filed under: Business,Camera,Infrared,Lumistar,Technology,Thermal Imaging,Uncategorized — Tags: — Lumistar @ 08:00



November 15, 2013

Hollywood’s Good, Bad & Ugly of Thermal Vision

Lumistar Movie Photos With Infrared

Thermal Imaging is often portrayed as something its not in Hollywood movies. For example, sometimes it’s portrayed incorrectly as being able to see through walls such as the beginning of Mission Impossible III. While MIT is working on x-ray technology that let’s armed forces get an approximate idea of how many people are in a building with little boxes representing the people, the technology is still in progress and certainly doesn’t involve the infrared spectrum. On the other hand, being able to use what is essentially long wave invisible red light, or infrared, to see through walls is absolutely impossible. Not even the use of powerful satellites using infrared technology is it possible to see in houses, no matter who says it, the physics say it’s – mission impossible! One of the most laughable misrepresentation of thermal infrared is the movie The Expendables. In the beginning scene where the heroes are rescuing a hostage they use futuristic thermal infrared goggles, a strategic high-tech advantage over their enemies in the dark. When the lights come on they are completely blinded as if it were night-vision when it it clearly is thermal infrared. Thermal infrared looks exactly the same with high light exposure or darkness as modern digital sensors are looking at the invisible infra-red energy. I suspect when they originally wrote the script and shot the scenes they intended it to be that greenish amplified moonlight night-vision, but Sylvester Stallone and the special effects department figured it would look cooler as thermal imaging in post-production, the heck with the science. In the movie Oblivion, thermal imaging is used for guardian droids to identify threats and looks somewhat similar to the Terminator movie franchise. Androids are often portrayed as having thermal vision as machines don’t have “cones” and “rods” in their eyes, medical terms describing how living beings can transition their vision in darkness. Therefore, without thermal infrared these machines would be vulnerable as they would see as a grainy CCTV camera would in the dark. These android movies can partially be overlooked because these moves take place in the sci-fi future and some of the technology is a way to go. (Or is it? See next month’s blog.) Finally, on the other extreme, the thermal infrared technology of the 1980’s was used in the movie Predator, represented by an alien’s everyday vision.  I’ve met with the scientist that was the consultant for the camera used in Predator several times, and the technology was state-of-the-art for of the 1980s. But as you can see from above movie still, today’s Lumistar cameras are literally 32x or more better than what was the most expensive resolution of the 80’s produced. Unfortunately, some camera companies still have not advanced that far from the 80s and look like the primitive vision of an alien creature that can make the interstellar travel to earth but can’t see too well. (Note:  I just realized every movie I can recall off-hand involving thermal vision either has Tom Cruise or Arnold Schwarzenegger in them.)





October 15, 2013

Pink Alien Planet Photographed With Infrared Camera

Lumistar Blog

Photo: Glowing a dark magenta, this image is an artist’s representation of the alien world. Click picture for greater detail. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger

Astronomers have snapped a photo, using NIR cameras, of a pink alien world that’s the smallest (lowest-mass) exoplanet yet found around a star like our own sun. The proper name for this alien planet is GJ 504b, is cold with few clouds and it likely has a dark magenta hue, infrared data from the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii revealed. “If we could travel to this giant planet, we would see a world still glowing from the heat of its formation with a color reminiscent of a dark cherry blossom, a dull magenta,” study researcher Michael McElwain, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., said in a statement from the space agency.

Although the gas planet is the smallest ever found around a sun-like star, it’s still huge — about four times the size of our solar system’s gas giant Jupiter. It lies nearly 44 Earth-sun distances from its central star, far beyond the system’s habitable zone. The newly found ‘pink planet’ has cause for alarm for scientists as it challenges common held beliefs in traditional models on how planets are formed due to its size and massive distance from it’s host star.

More: http://www.space.com/

Though it is the smallest alien world caught on camera around a sun-like star, the gas planet around GJ 504 is still huge — about four times the size of Jupiter. It lies nearly 44 Earth-sun distances from its central star, far beyond the system’s habitable zone, and it has an effective temperature of about 460 degrees Fahrenheit (237 Celsius), according to the researchers’ estimates. – See more at: http://www.space.com/22265-small-alien-planet-direct-photo.html#sthash.5nm6dAjg.dpuf
Though it is the smallest alien world caught on camera around a sun-like star, the gas planet around GJ 504 is still huge — about four times the size of Jupiter. It lies nearly 44 Earth-sun distances from its central star, far beyond the system’s habitable zone, and it has an effective temperature of about 460 degrees Fahrenheit (237 Celsius), according to the researchers’ estimates. – See more at: http://www.space.com/22265-small-alien-planet-direct-photo.html#sthash.5nm6dAjg.dpuf




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